February 6, 2011

Designing packaging for Jellypods

Posted in Airlines, Blue Ocean, Branding, Business model, Feedback, Luggage, Marketing, Materials, Packaging, Production, Strategy at 10:56 am by Kilo

Packaging of Jellypods has been something we have considered right from the start, as part of the Blue Ocean approach.

We’ve been through a wide range iterations, from external to internal, from lots to none, but now we have started to zero in on a couple of concepts.

The mainline thinking of packaging Jellypods has always been around allowing people to see and feel the product on the shelf, while also having the benefits and value of the product explained visually to the potential buyer.

It also can’t cost the earth – there’s no point working so hard to cost optimize the basic product only to add 30% extra cost for a wrapper.

That set of goals is encapsulated in the latest designs for a wraparound package which is shown below:

However, one other option that is still seriously under consideration is to avoid external packaging altogether. In a Blue Ocean sense, this makes a lot of sense – it eliminates something that maybe adds little value.

Crocs, a story we mentioned earlier on the blog, deliberately decided to place their products out in the open air, with zero packaging, to show the wide variety of colours.


Jellypods have a convenient little Jelly-shaped hanging hole built into the ziptabs that would make this a very viable option, and because the product is crystal clear, it would be quite easy to put all “packaging detail” inside the Jellypod itself. What do you think?

 

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February 5, 2011

The story of Trunki

Posted in Airlines, Branding, Business model, Design, Luggage, Marketing, Production, Strategy at 10:33 am by Kilo

On another of those searches across the vast reaches of the internet looking for information on companies that came out of nowhere and entered the luggage/travel goods sector, we stumbled on the story of Trunki.

Trunki is a product that mixes luggage with play for kids – it is luggage kids can sit on and roll along in the airport. It was invented by a designer called Rob Law, who got inspiration one day while browsing a local store. He took the idea forward and after many challenges has created a multi-million dollar business that has sold several hundred thousand units over the past 5-6 years, despite quite a few major setbacks:

  • a distributor who went out of business
  • the confiscation of his Chinese mould tooling
  • the very public failure of a trivial component on national television

You can watch a short documentary of how Rob got through those problems below.

Despite all those challenges, Rob and Trunki have kept going and kept growing, and it looks like he is now seeing the fruits of all that hard work, with significant growth, new deals in the Americas, new products, and now, according to his corporate accounts, quite a profitable, healthy business.

How is this relevant to Jellypods? Well firstly it’s an entrepreneurial story in the luggage sector, and we can learn valuable lessons from anyone who has done that. Secondly it’s a story about moulded luggage that was designed for a specific niche target market, which is a direct parallel to what we are doing with Jellypods. And thirdly it offers some insight to the timeline required when overcoming challenges, staying focused and ultimately delivering success.

We’ve never met Rob Law, but after hearing these stories, we’d like to get to know him. Let’s hope that Jellypods can benefit from some of those lessons.

January 15, 2011

The market for Jellypods

Posted in Airlines, Blue Ocean, Branding, Business model, Design, Funding, Investors, Luggage, Marketing, Materials, Web at 11:28 am by Kilo

We started the Jellypods journey from a personal need, but we’re continuing it beyond the “half-hour serious” phase because to the potential of the original idea.

The original Jellypods design, for frequent flyers, is addressing a large market;  according to IATA, the International Air Transport Association, more than 2,750,000,000 passengers – equivalent to 40% of the entire population of the planet Earth – are going to get on an airplane in 2011. Now not all of those are unique travellers – many are the same person taking multiple trips, frequent flyers.

But just one airline loyalty programme, Lufthansa’s Miles and More, has 15,000,000 registered frequent travellers, and about 350,000 of those are elite travellers, Senators or Hons. Multiply those kinds of figures by the number of major airlines on the planet (about 100 of the 300 or so out there), and that’s a big market that can be addressed relatively readily.

Then when we started to look beyond the core market of the initial design, and look at other uses for nicely designed, waterproof, quirky bags made of hygienic, stretchy, safe, washable, heat/sun/rain/sea/tea/cold resistant bags we found literally dozens of markets out there and started naming various new Jellypods designs after them. We also saw that the basic design could be extended and evolved in new ways to create ideas like Jellyshells (more about this later this year), opening up even more new markets.

April 10, 2010

Designing the logo

Posted in Branding, Design, Trademarks at 9:31 am by Kilo

With a nice shiny new name and web domain now up and running, and a few basic product sketches already churning through the CAD machine (more about that soon), our thoughts turned to branding.

We are very lucky at Jellypods to live in the internet age and have some good friends around the planet who are helping out with all kinds of stuff, from website design to computer modeling of the product to design of the molds. But the root of everything is the nice logo created for us by the design team at Fathom in the UK.

It’s sometimes really amazing how a few words and a rough sketch in Powerpoint can be turned into something quite literally iconic. We had some vague ideas that we wanted the cute little jelly in the logo somehow, and also that we wanted to mimic the shape of the Jellypod in the ‘squircle’ shape. We were also quite keen to have a standard Windows/Mac font like Eurostile to avoid compatibility issues. The rough sketch we sent across in the brief looked like this:-

After a short iteration process that threw up a range of ideas, the design guys at Fathom took those thoughts and merged them into a much more cohesive little unit that also delivered the iconic symbol we had been searching for. It’s so nice we will be using it as part of every product, embossed into the side of each Jellypod. So thanks a lot to Nigel, Giles and the rest of the team in Poole for a great job on creating our first – and probably most important – bit of serious identity.